Friday, October 18, 2013

The hashtag: #becauserapists

Highlighting every time something is ruined, because: rapists.

For example:

  1. College females drinking alcohol.
  2. ACTUAL LIVES.

So I’ve been trying not to use “you guys” when addressing my female friends anymore.

But I don’t like saying “you girls”, because I am usually talking to adult women. And I don’t want to say “you ladies”, because I don’t know - ew.

So I’ve decided on “y’all”.

Sexism turned Southern.

But this doesn’t make her points about women and drinking any less true. Educating women on the factors that make them vulnerable to assault is not victim-blaming. It is simply practical advice backed up by data. We tell travelers to be aware of their surroundings in unfamiliar cities to reduce the risk of mugging. We teach new drivers defensive strategies to avoid being hit by drunks and speeders. This should not be any different.

Alcohol Education Is Not Rape Apology

OKAY but: 1. If you remove rapists from the situation, drunk women would not get sexually assaulted. 2. This IS different: Sexual assault is a highly GENDERED crime while muggings and drunk driving accidents are not. 

The “precautionary” discourse normalizes rape in society as something women should have to accept. Seriously, NO. 

Tuesday, September 24, 2013
Gloria! @ the #wmmSUMMIT over the weekend.

Gloria! @ the #wmmSUMMIT over the weekend.

Wednesday, August 21, 2013
Unwed white girls who became pregnant in the postwar years were considered psychologically disturbed but treatable, whereas their black counterparts were presumed to be biologically hypersexual and deviant. Historian Rickie Solinger demonstrates that in the 1950s an unwed white girl who became pregnant could go to a maternity home before her pregnancy showed, deliver the baby and give it up for adoption, and return home to her community with no one the wiser. (White parents concocted stories of their daughters being given the opportunity to study for a semester with relatives.) She could then resume the role of the “nice” girl.

Unwed pregnant black girls, on the other hand, were barred from maternity homes; they were threatened with jail or termination of welfare; and they were accused of using their sexuality in order to be eligible for larger welfare checks. Politicians regarded unwed pregnant black girls as a societal problem, declaring—as they continue to declare today—that they did not want taxpayers to support black illegitimate babies, and sough to control black female sexuality through sterilization legislation
Leora Tanenbaum, Slut!: Growing Up Female with a Bad Reputation (via janersm)

(Source: dishonora)


Women’s sexuality is something that I’m obsessed with. I think it’s weird that teenage girls know more about giving blow jobs than they do about masturbation. It makes me sick to my stomach that so many young girls think sex is just about a guy finishing. - Elizabeth Olsen, for Dazed & Confused 

#PREACH

Women’s sexuality is something that I’m obsessed with. I think it’s weird that teenage girls know more about giving blow jobs than they do about masturbation. It makes me sick to my stomach that so many young girls think sex is just about a guy finishing. - Elizabeth Olsen, for Dazed & Confused

#PREACH

(Source: fuckyeahelizabetholsen)

Wednesday, July 17, 2013

withlove-tayy:

blackgirlwhiteboylove:

knowledgeequalsblackpower:

kronosinasuit:

Kerry Washington being amazing as always. 

Understand colorblinders out there. Please get it.

I can’t even count the number of times I’ve said this.

My respect for her continues to grow

Smart and beautiful as usual KW!

Monday, July 15, 2013
The question is not really when life begins. The question is whether we recognize women and other people with uteri as humans whose lives have intrinsic value and the rights of agency, bodily autonomy, and consent. It is only because such a vast swath of our population cannot or will not answer a resounding and unqualified “yes” to that question that there is even space for a reprehensible debate about when life begins. Melissa McEwan, being amazing as usual. (via loveyourchaos)

(Source: sashareads)

Think about it: We’re told over and over that if Zimmerman was afraid of Martin, according to Florida law, he had the right to put a bullet in the chamber of his concealed handgun, get out of his car after being told not to by the 911 dispatcher and follow and confront Martin and shoot him to death.

At the same time, we are told that Martin, who had far greater reason to fear Zimmerman, practically and for reasons of American history, did not have the right to confront his stalker, stand his ground and defend himself, including by using his fists. We are told that this was entirely unjustified and by doing so, Martin justified his own execution.

What about Trayvon Martin’s right to ‘stand his ground’? | CNN

(via socialismartnature)

Sunday, July 14, 2013

Having to clarify that you’re “not interested in racists” on your OK Cupid profile, because surprise: racism is still a thing.

And then the dummies thinking I wrote that to be cute.

abrasivelyyours:

Black Teens With Racial Pride Do Better in School
AFRICANGLOBE – African American teenagers perform better academically when their parents instill in them a sense of racial pride.
New research shows that when parents use racial socialization—talking to their children or engaging in activities that promote feelings of racial knowledge, pride, and connection—it offsets racial discrimination’s potentially negative impact on students’ academic development.
Preparing adolescents for possible bias is also a protective factor, though a combination of this preparation and racial socialization is ideal in moderating the possible damaging effects of racial discrimination by teachers or fellow students, according to a study published in the journal Child Development.
“Our findings challenge the notion that ‘race blindness’ is a universally ideal parenting approach, especially since previous research has shown that racially conscious parenting strategies at either extreme—either ‘race blindness’ or promoting mistrust of other races—are associated with negative outcomes for African American youth,” says lead author Ming-Te Wang, assistant professor of psychology in education at the University of Pittsburgh, who coauthored the study with Harvard University’s James P. Huguley.
“When African American parents instill a proud, informed, and sober perspective of race in their sons and daughters, these children are more likely to experience increased academic success,” says Wang.
Racial Pride Beneficial
Although previous studies have shown that parental racial socialization is beneficial to the mental health of African American youth, few researchers have looked at how daily experiences with racial discrimination in a school context are related to the child’s educational prospects.
Scholarly research has shown that African American students, males in particular, are at risk for being unfairly disciplined, being discouraged from taking advanced classes, or receiving lower grades than they deserved, all because of their race. Other studies point to negative peer treatment because of race—getting into fights, being bullied, or not being selected for teams or activities.
Wang and Huguley explored how racial discrimination relates to the students’ educational outcomes, specifically grade-point averages, educational aspirations, the sense of belonging to a school, and cognitive engagement, which is the initiative a student takes in his or her own learning. And they set out to determine how the outcomes are affected by parental racial socialization.
Using a combination of questionnaires and face-to-face interviews of both students and parents, the study examines the home and school racial experiences of 630 African American high school students in a diverse but mostly Black urban area on the East Coast of the United States.
Unlike other studies that focus on low-income families, this project involved participants who came from a wide range of socioeconomic backgrounds. The median household income range was $46,000-$50,000, and 40 percent of the parents or guardians had a college degree.
Overall, the study found racial pride to be the most powerful factor in protecting children from the sting of discriminatory behavior. It directly and positively related to three out of four academic outcomes—grade-point averages, educational aspirations, and cognitive engagement—and was directly related to resilience in the face of discrimination. Preparation for bias was directly related to only one outcome—the sense of belonging to a school.
“Our study provides empirical evidence that the longstanding practice in the African American community of cultivating racial pride and preparing children to face racial bias in society should be considered among appropriate and beneficial practices in parenting Black children,” says Wang, who plans to conduct the same kind of research with Latino and Asian American teenagers.
The study was supported by a grant from the National Institute of Child Health and Human Development.

abrasivelyyours:

Black Teens With Racial Pride Do Better in School

AFRICANGLOBE – African American teenagers perform better academically when their parents instill in them a sense of racial pride.

New research shows that when parents use racial socialization—talking to their children or engaging in activities that promote feelings of racial knowledge, pride, and connection—it offsets racial discrimination’s potentially negative impact on students’ academic development.

Preparing adolescents for possible bias is also a protective factor, though a combination of this preparation and racial socialization is ideal in moderating the possible damaging effects of racial discrimination by teachers or fellow students, according to a study published in the journal Child Development.

“Our findings challenge the notion that ‘race blindness’ is a universally ideal parenting approach, especially since previous research has shown that racially conscious parenting strategies at either extreme—either ‘race blindness’ or promoting mistrust of other races—are associated with negative outcomes for African American youth,” says lead author Ming-Te Wang, assistant professor of psychology in education at the University of Pittsburgh, who coauthored the study with Harvard University’s James P. Huguley.

“When African American parents instill a proud, informed, and sober perspective of race in their sons and daughters, these children are more likely to experience increased academic success,” says Wang.

Racial Pride Beneficial

Although previous studies have shown that parental racial socialization is beneficial to the mental health of African American youth, few researchers have looked at how daily experiences with racial discrimination in a school context are related to the child’s educational prospects.

Scholarly research has shown that African American students, males in particular, are at risk for being unfairly disciplined, being discouraged from taking advanced classes, or receiving lower grades than they deserved, all because of their race. Other studies point to negative peer treatment because of race—getting into fights, being bullied, or not being selected for teams or activities.

Wang and Huguley explored how racial discrimination relates to the students’ educational outcomes, specifically grade-point averages, educational aspirations, the sense of belonging to a school, and cognitive engagement, which is the initiative a student takes in his or her own learning. And they set out to determine how the outcomes are affected by parental racial socialization.

Using a combination of questionnaires and face-to-face interviews of both students and parents, the study examines the home and school racial experiences of 630 African American high school students in a diverse but mostly Black urban area on the East Coast of the United States.

Unlike other studies that focus on low-income families, this project involved participants who came from a wide range of socioeconomic backgrounds. The median household income range was $46,000-$50,000, and 40 percent of the parents or guardians had a college degree.

Overall, the study found racial pride to be the most powerful factor in protecting children from the sting of discriminatory behavior. It directly and positively related to three out of four academic outcomes—grade-point averages, educational aspirations, and cognitive engagement—and was directly related to resilience in the face of discrimination. Preparation for bias was directly related to only one outcome—the sense of belonging to a school.

“Our study provides empirical evidence that the longstanding practice in the African American community of cultivating racial pride and preparing children to face racial bias in society should be considered among appropriate and beneficial practices in parenting Black children,” says Wang, who plans to conduct the same kind of research with Latino and Asian American teenagers.

The study was supported by a grant from the National Institute of Child Health and Human Development.

While Trayvon’s murder sparked much discussion about racism in our country, it should also call attention to sexism, particularly as it intersects with racism to distinctively affect the lives of African-American women. Black women, such as Trayvon’s mother, are continually at the forefront of black activism, yet our plight remains invisible. When we think of “black-on-black murder,” lynching, riots, executions, and the prison industrial complex, far too often, only black men come to mind. However, as the essays in Gender and Lynching: The Politics of Memory inform us, black girls and women were (and still are) also victims of these brutalities. Black women, for example, are murdered at a rate more than two and a half times higher than white women. We are also the fastest growing prison population and juvenile justice population. And, according to an ongoing study conducted by Black Women’s Blueprint, sixty percent of black girls have experienced sexual abuse before the age of 18. Trayvon Martin Is Still ‘Our Son,’ But What About Our Daughters?  

(Source: notime4yourshit)

What I feel like I didn’t understand in my pre-safer sex days was that the very challenges of making safer sex happen - being articulate about what I wanted and how to manage the risks involved - would actually lead to much safer feeling sex. Not just safer from STIs, but safer from the dozens of other anxieties I felt about being sexual. If my goal was to reduce sexual anxiety, talking more about sex, not less, would have gotten me there a lot faster.

-Laurel Isaac, “Figuring Out How to be a Lesbian Safer Sexpert" via Scarleteen

(submitted by butchwalrus)

Saturday, July 13, 2013
Some problems we share as women, some we do not. You [white women] fear your children will grow up to join the patriarchy and testify against you; we fear our children will be dragged from a car and shot down in the street, and you will turn your backs on the reasons they are dying. Audre Lorde, “Age, Race, Class, and Sex: Women Redefining Difference” (via sundayafternoonsocialclub)

(Source: floralcrow)